Maxim Gorky

Alexei Maximovich Peshkov ( or  – 18 June 1936), primarily known as Maxim Gorky (), was a Russian and Soviet writer, a founder of the socialist realism literary method, and a political activist. He was also a five-time nominee for the Nobel Prize in Literature. Prior to his renown as an author, he frequently changed jobs and roamed across the Russian Empire; these experiences would later influence his writing. Gorky's most famous works were ''The Lower Depths'' (1902), ''Twenty-six Men and a Girl'' (1899), ''The Song of the Stormy Petrel'' (1901), ''My Childhood'' (1913–1914), ''Mother'' (1906), ''Summerfolk'' (1904) and ''Children of the Sun'' (1905). He had associations with fellow Russian writers Leo Tolstoy and Anton Chekhov; Gorky would later mention them in his memoirs.

Gorky was active in the emerging Marxist communist movement. He publicly opposed the Tsarist regime, and for a time closely associated himself with Vladimir Lenin and Alexander Bogdanov's Bolshevik wing of the party. For a significant part of his life, he was exiled from Russia and later the Soviet Union. In 1932, he returned to the USSR on Joseph Stalin's personal invitation and lived there until his death in June 1936. Provided by Wikipedia
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by Gorki, Maxim
Published 1949
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by Gorki, Maxim
Published 1923
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by Gorki, Maxim
Published 1907
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