Social Security : The Story of British Social Progress and the Beveridge Plan

1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams any of the five or six million people of working age who have been left outside the range of our British Social Insurance schemes. There is no reason why National Health Insurance should not be expanded and should not provide...

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Main Authors: Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services (contributor), Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
Format: TEXT
Language:English
English
Published: London : G.G. Harrap and Co. 1943
Subjects:
UK
Summary:1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams any of the five or six million people of working age who have been left outside the range of our British Social Insurance schemes. There is no reason why National Health Insurance should not be expanded and should not provide for a man's wife and children in the same way as Unemployment Insurance does to-day. The unemployed man with a wife and two children draws 38s. per week as a right. Clearly the remedy is (1) to pay the same rates of benefit in both kinds of emergency, where home income is interrupted, (2) to see that the rates are sufficient for reasonable subsistence, and (3) to widen the range of insurance. (b) Families in Want. Where the family earnings are low the possession of children has always been a cause of poverty ; and the larger the family the more destitute it becomes. Nor is this confined to emergencies such as the unemployment of the wage-earner. Many a man on full wages with four children or more is desperately poor until his older children reach working age. His high rent alone may ensure this, if he tries to provide a healthy and not overcrowded home. Expert social surveys have demonstrated that, in the towns of Britain, nearly one quarter of all the disclosed poverty has been due to failure to relate incomes during earning to the needs of the family groups. How much hardship due to this cause has remained hidden no one can estimate. It is hidden Note - In this and other chapters the words 'subsistence rates' or 'minimum of subsistence' have been used. What do they mean? No final answer to cover the future can be given in terms of money, but in Chart 5 are shown the estimated requirements of different households, covering the cost of food, rent, and other needs at 1938 prices. The regional variations of house rent - a very intractable difficulty - are shown in Chart 6. 16 15X/2/566/303