Social Security : The Story of British Social Progress and the Beveridge Plan

1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams (b) Inside Insurance. New benefits of many kinds will be added : For all citizens Comprehensive medical and hospital treatment; a death benefit or funeral grant of £20; a retirement pension at minimum age 65 (men) and 60 (wo...

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Main Authors: Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services (contributor), Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
Format: TEXT
Language:English
English
Published: London : G.G. Harrap and Co. 1943
Subjects:
UK
Summary:1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams (b) Inside Insurance. New benefits of many kinds will be added : For all citizens Comprehensive medical and hospital treatment; a death benefit or funeral grant of £20; a retirement pension at minimum age 65 (men) and 60 (women). These vast items of the Plan have all been accepted, subject to further consideration of the actual rates of grant and pension. For all wage- or salary-earners Extension of unemployment benefits beyond 26 weeks if required; industrial pensions after 13 weeks of incapacity due to injury or accident. The Government are not committed to these two propositions. For housewives Marriage grant of £10; maternity benefit of 36s. per week for 13 weeks for women wage-earners; maternity grants of £4 lump sum. Widow's benefit (instead of pension) of 36s. for 13 weeks, guardian benefit and separation benefit. The Government's proposals are likely to be different. (c) Widows' Pensions. The existing widow's pension of 10s. per week for life is to be cut out. After 13 weeks the able-bodied widow without young children should become a wage-eamer, says Beveridge. Similarly, old age pensions will be converted into retirement pensions. This means that, in principle, no one should draw both pension and wages. Both these changes are designed to keep people working as long as they can, in order to keep up production, and to reduce the enormous pensions bill which confronts the nation. Both have been 34 15X/2/566/303