Social Security : The Story of British Social Progress and the Beveridge Plan

1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams weeks on full wages, and he had been putting by a bit for the fares. But they could not afford the ordinary commercial seaside lodgings, so they tried one of the Holiday Hostels, run by the National Holiday Camps Corporation....

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Main Authors: Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services (contributor), Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
Format: TEXT
Language:English
English
Published: London : G.G. Harrap and Co. 1943
Subjects:
UK
Summary:1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams weeks on full wages, and he had been putting by a bit for the fares. But they could not afford the ordinary commercial seaside lodgings, so they tried one of the Holiday Hostels, run by the National Holiday Camps Corporation. This was a public body set up by the Government to convert, run, and maintain some of the ex-munition hostels as holiday centres for the people. It was a lovely place among the high hills in the north. There was a crèche for babies, including Tom. They repeated this jaunt in other years. Needless to say, this episode in their story had nothing to do with the Beveridge Plan. In course of time two more children were born, Mary and Edith. No maternity benefit was payable at these births, because Eve was no longer a wage-earner, but she drew the £4 maternity grant. On both occasions the local Health Centre supplied paid Home Helps to look after little Tom and the home while Eve was away in hospital. No ordinary children's allowance had been payable for Tom, because he was the first child, but when Adam had one or two spells of sickness, each lasting a couple of weeks, he drew 40s. per week for himself and Eve and 8s. for Tom. His normal weekly earnings were £4 10s. at this time. He worked a 48-hour week with occasional overtime. With the second child, Mary, the regular allowance of 8s. per week began, and the arrival of Edith put it up to 16s. Thus the family's normal weekly income was now £5 6s. less insurance, dropping to £3 4s. if Adam fell sick. It was Eve Black, not her husband, who drew these children's allowances from the local Security Office. The school-leaving age was now 15 in Bristol, but Tom was a good scholar and his parents kept him at his secondary school till 16. They were able to draw the 45 15X/2/566/303