Social Security : The Story of British Social Progress and the Beveridge Plan

1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams POSTSCRIPT THE CONSTRUCTIVE PRINCIPLE The realization of post-war social security will not merely be a question of finding the money for better benefits, higher pensions, and ampler assistance. Real progress must be won in th...

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Main Authors: Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services (contributor), Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
Format: TEXT
Language:English
English
Published: London : G.G. Harrap and Co. 1943
Subjects:
UK
author Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services
Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
spellingShingle Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services
Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
Maitland Sara Hallinan
Pamphlets: No organisation cited
Health care
Social security--Great Britain
Social Security : The Story of British Social Progress and the Beveridge Plan
author_facet Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services
Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
author_role contributor
publishDate 1943
id HEA-1340_fc30f31a2f8a4e6c8e97ca57b55681a1
language English
English
publisher London : G.G. Harrap and Co.
topic Maitland Sara Hallinan
Pamphlets: No organisation cited
Health care
Social security--Great Britain
geographic UK
format TEXT
description 1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams POSTSCRIPT THE CONSTRUCTIVE PRINCIPLE The realization of post-war social security will not merely be a question of finding the money for better benefits, higher pensions, and ampler assistance. Real progress must be won in the industrial field, in the field of work, wages, and better conditions, based on higher productivity. As compared with that, the Beveridge Plan is only an "Ambulance Service," co-ordinated from the bits and pieces of the past and brought up to date. But we are, as a nation, ready and waiting for that improved service. Its success will depend also on the acceptance by all parties of new obligations of many kinds. Prevention of misfortune as well as its relief must be the common duty. The emphasis must be on the speediest possible rehabilitation of each individual ; that is to say, on remedying the condition, such as sickness or unemployment, which causes him to claim benefit. In the past low rates of benefit or a deterrent means test have been deliberately relied upon as incentives to applicants to return to self-support at the earliest possible moment. That was at best a negative remedy. No longer do we want to starve people back to health by cutting down their benefit ; nor use the spur of want as a cure for a man's unemployment. Positive remedies must be our motto for the future. No man should lack any form of medical care which will most quickly restore him to health and wage-earning. By the same token he should be obliged to avail himself of that care and cure and to co-operate whole-heartedly with the service provided for him by the 59 15X/2/566/303
title Social Security : The Story of British Social Progress and the Beveridge Plan
collection MRC Digital Collections
institution MRC - The Modern Records Centre, University of Warwick
url http://hdl.handle.net/10796/8B5C784E-D575-45EF-83A0-D34283714890
thumbnail http://shp2.amsab.be/thumb/HEA-1340_fc30f31a2f8a4e6c8e97ca57b55681a1.jpg
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