Social Security Guide : The White Paper and the Beveridge Report Compared

1944-10-01 1944 1940s 20 pages 5/- instead of the Beveridge 8/- (or 9/- if there were no school meals and milk). The White Paper also promises free school meals and milk to all children in grant-aided primary and secondary schools. The White Paper includes additionally:- Maternity:- Attendant's...

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Main Authors: Great Britain. Office of the Minister of Reconstruction. Social insurance ; Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services. Social insurance and allied services ; Beveridge, William Henry Beveridge, Baron, 1879-1963 (contributor), Clarke, Joan Simeon
Format: TEXT
Language:English
English
Published: London : The Social Security League 1 October 1944
Subjects:
UK
Summary:1944-10-01 1944 1940s 20 pages 5/- instead of the Beveridge 8/- (or 9/- if there were no school meals and milk). The White Paper also promises free school meals and milk to all children in grant-aided primary and secondary schools. The White Paper includes additionally:- Maternity:- Attendant's allowance for 4 weeks to non-gainfully occupied married women 20/- Widows:- Pensions for widows over 50 when widowed or when ceasing to be eligible for guardian's benefit .................. 20/- Old Age is the main difference between the Beveridge and the Government benefit rates. The Government will pay a flat rate pension, to all who are qualified, of 35/- double and 20/- single. Beveridge proposed to pay 25/- double and 14/- single at the start of the scheme, and to increase the pension for all those insured under present schemes by 1/6 double and 1/- single at two-yearly intervals until the full rate of 40/- double and 24/- single was reached after 20 years. Those not now at present insured would, after 10 years insurance receive the rate currently being paid to the first group, but would not join the upwards progression. Persons in this group who were within 10 years of pensionable age when the scheme were introduced, would have the option of exemption from the pension element in their social insurance contribution. They would then get no pension. The Government also wish those not now insured to contribute for 10 years before receiving retirement pensions, but under their scheme those within 10 years of pensionable age and who retire before the end of the 10 years period, may choose between continuing to contribute at the Class IV rate, or claiming a refund with interest of the pension element in the contributions they have paid, thus forfeiting their right to a pension. The White Paper adopts the Beveridge suggestion that those who postpone retirement should receive an added 2/- double or 1/-single on their Weekly pensions for every complete year that they stay at work after reaching pensionable age. Both the Government and Beveridge propose to reduce pensions if the pensioner earns above a certain amount. The differences between the two proposals are small. The Government would disregard earnings of £1 weekly, and Beveridge £3 monthly. Above this the Government would reduce the pension shilling for shilling of earnings, and Beveridge only to the extent of one-half or two-thirds of earnings. So that a pensioner would have no incentive to earn more than £1 weekly under the Government scheme, though he would pocket the whole of this sum. Beveridge would reduce his earnings above £3 monthly, but leave him an incentive to earn more. Conditions for Receiving Benefit Here there is little difference between the two schemes. For the receipt of sickness or unemployment benefit, both insist on a minimum of 26 contributions having been actually paid. Also the Government stipulates that 50, against Beveridge's 48, contributions shall be paid or excused in the previous insurance year. The latter condition also applies to the recipt [receipt] of retirement pensions in both schemes, but the Government also demands that there should have 13 15X/2/453/3