English methods of birth control

1915 1915 1910s 18 pages 6 as some authorities formerly viewed it; but, on the other hand, is considered by the most prominent authorities as injurious to the woman's nervous system. The following are some of the best known men who look upon the practice as not beneficial to the woman : August...

Full description

Main Author: Sanger, Margaret, 1879-1966
Format: TEXT
Language:English
English
Published: [1915?]
Subjects:
UK
Summary:1915 1915 1910s 18 pages 6 as some authorities formerly viewed it; but, on the other hand, is considered by the most prominent authorities as injurious to the woman's nervous system. The following are some of the best known men who look upon the practice as not beneficial to the woman : August Forel, Heinrich Kisch, Von Krafft-Ebing, Mensinga, Hirt, Frend, Lowenfeld, Elischer, Havelock Ellis, and many others. In the preceding pamphlet on "Family Limitation," I have explained this habit and the effects it has upon women, and shall not dwell upon it here. It is sufficient to say that "coitus interruptus" is considered as the cause of nervous disturbances and other serious conditions of the generative organs in woman by many prominent medical authorities of the day. "The lack of sexual satisfaction," concludes Kisch, "aggravates nervous and hysterical trouble in women, while suitably regulated intercourse with mutual satisfaction has an actively beneficial effect." There has been among men a common idea that woman had little or no sex desire or interest, and that marriage sanctioned a union which made of woman a recipient but not a mutual partner in the sex life. Fortunately this idea is giving way, and men of ideals and fine temperaments dislike the idea of the relation when it is not mutual. That is one of the reasons that the use of preventive measures has come to play so important a part in the lives of both men and women, and why it must sooner or later receive the fullest attention from the medical profession, as well as from society at large. Tolstoy was opposed to the use of preventives because they liberate men from the cares and sorrows of having children, which he thought must be regarded as the penance to be paid for sensual love. One might naturally ask why the children should be made to suffer; and if sensual love is a degraded love, why not prevent children being born in it? I think we, who have in view a new race, do not desire that race to be the penance of previous generations' sins. There are only a few authorities to-day who look upon the 15X/2/566/51