Social Security : The Story of British Social Progress and the Beveridge Plan

1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams tions. Even though she does not work for wages, her pension qualifications should be preserved, and she should probably be entitled to pension irrespective of her own age when her husband retires in his old age (65 or over)....

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Main Authors: Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services (contributor), Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
Format: TEXT
Language:English
English
Published: London : G.G. Harrap and Co. 1943
Subjects:
UK
Summary:1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams tions. Even though she does not work for wages, her pension qualifications should be preserved, and she should probably be entitled to pension irrespective of her own age when her husband retires in his old age (65 or over). She should also be insured against widowhood and legal separation. (e) There are many other needs and risks which are sufficiently common to be covered by insurance, but whether by compulsory methods or voluntary action is not so easy to determine. Funeral expenses are the commonest of all, though it is a question whether we want to encourage and perpetuate the wasteful national habit of a costly burial, complete with hearse, black plumes, etc. Funerals might well be rationed. In any case, at present, it would be eminently desirable to include a universal funeral grant in the enlarged social insurance scheme. The Beveridge Plan proposes a grant of £20, part of which would be needed for other expenses than the funeral itself. Incidentally, this would give to wage-earners a much cheaper form of funeral insurance than that offered by the commercial insurance companies, which now draw from their pockets a premium income for death benefits of no less than £80,000,000 a year. For some other purposes voluntary insurance is certainly a desirable resource and should be encouraged. It is a form of thrift, and the saving habits of our people are going to be an even more valuable asset in the post-war Britain than they have been in the past. Let us hope that, among other popular insurances, the provision for expenditure on education, holidays, and travel will become increasingly fashionable. Before this war and the now widespread concession of holidays with pay, not more than one-third of our people were ever able to enjoy as much as an annual week's holiday away from home. 25 15X/2/566/303