Social Security : The Story of British Social Progress and the Beveridge Plan

1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams (b) Persons outside Working Age. Class V (green symbols). Those below working age mainly to be covered by children's allowances. Class VI (blue symbols). Those retired above working age and covered by pensions. These pay...

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Main Authors: Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services (contributor), Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
Format: TEXT
Language:English
English
Published: London : G.G. Harrap and Co. 1943
Subjects:
UK
Summary:1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams (b) Persons outside Working Age. Class V (green symbols). Those below working age mainly to be covered by children's allowances. Class VI (blue symbols). Those retired above working age and covered by pensions. These pay no contributions. (2) THE NEW BENEFITS AND THE GOVERNMENT'S PROPOSED MODIFICATIONS WHERE KNOWN Now as to the improved benefits which are offered to these classes under the Beveridge Plan. The governing principle of the adult scale is that 24s. per week for a single man or woman and 40s. per week for a man and wife represents at present a minimum of subsistence when earnings are interrupted by any cause. The Government do not quite accept this principle. They do not see how a fixed contractual benefit can always be guaranteed to be a minimum of subsistence, which is bound to be a variable figure in money: costs of living vary both in time and in place. The Government have postponed their decision on the actual figures for benefits, but their proposals are unlikely to differ much from those put forward by Sir William Beveridge. (a) Outside Insurance. There should be Family Endowment in the form of children's allowances for children up to ages 15 or 16 if still at school, at an average rate of 8s. per week for each child except the first child. Thus, a man with three children would have 16s. per week added to his normal wage income. During unemployment or sickness of the breadwinner allowances would be paid for his wife and all three children, making his cash benefits up to 64s. per week, i.e., 40s. for self and wife, and 24s. for the three children. The Government have accepted this proposal in principle, but will probably reduce the cash allowances to 5s. (average) while giving rather more assistance in kind to all young children. 31 15X/2/566/303