Social Security : The Story of British Social Progress and the Beveridge Plan

1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams criticized as being less generous than the present arrangements, and the Government are unlikely to cut off the widow's pension altogether, e.g., for the lone widow between 50 and 60. (d) Medical Treatment. Medical trea...

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Main Authors: Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services (contributor), Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
Format: TEXT
Language:English
English
Published: London : G.G. Harrap and Co. 1943
Subjects:
UK
author Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services
Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
spellingShingle Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services
Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
Maitland Sara Hallinan
Pamphlets: No organisation cited
Health care
Social security--Great Britain
Social Security : The Story of British Social Progress and the Beveridge Plan
author_facet Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services
Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
author_role contributor
publishDate 1943
id HEA-1317_9d6ab298a41c4ddebc7d20f5e5df3ecc
language English
English
publisher London : G.G. Harrap and Co.
topic Maitland Sara Hallinan
Pamphlets: No organisation cited
Health care
Social security--Great Britain
geographic UK
format TEXT
description 1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams criticized as being less generous than the present arrangements, and the Government are unlikely to cut off the widow's pension altogether, e.g., for the lone widow between 50 and 60. (d) Medical Treatment. Medical treatment for all is to be taken out of the insurance held. Presumably there will be an end to the present system of N.H.I. panel doctors, etc. A new national service for the prevention and cure of disease and for rehabilitation is one of the basic assumptions of the report. Probably it will be a public service. This vast transformation with all that it promises for our national health has been accepted in principle by the Government. (e) Retirement Pensions for the Old. These are to be 24s. as a right for a single person in future, as against the present basic rate of 10s. plus the chance of a supplement from the Assistance Board. A married couple will get 40s. a week instead of £1. But these are "eventual" pensions, not payable at the full rate till 1965. This is a scheme which can only be fulfilled on a contributory basis in 20 years. The immediate proposal for mid-1944 is a pension of 14s. for a single person and 25s. joint. Thereafter basic pensions will increase at the rate of 1s. 6d. joint or 1s. single every second year. The new classes not hitherto insured for State pensions will have to pay contributions for a qualifying period of 10 years. Those among them who are already aged over 55 can claim exemption from this part of their contribution. The Government have definitely rejected this scheme. They are prepared, said Sir John Anderson, to fix a higher basic pension now and keep it there ; but they refuse to burden posterity with a commitment to a rising scale which would run into "many hundreds, if not thousands, of millions of pounds in future" (see also Chapter V). 35 15X/2/566/303
title Social Security : The Story of British Social Progress and the Beveridge Plan
collection MRC Digital Collections
institution MRC - The Modern Records Centre, University of Warwick
url http://hdl.handle.net/10796/8B55F51A-2846-41A6-936E-FF5287BFA3D6
thumbnail http://shp2.amsab.be/thumb/HEA-1317_9d6ab298a41c4ddebc7d20f5e5df3ecc.jpg
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