Social Security : The Story of British Social Progress and the Beveridge Plan

1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams 8s. allowance for him till his sixteenth birthday, but no longer. Mary and Edith left school at 15 and got small jobs, but they had to attend a Day Continuation School or Workers' College on three afternoons a week. No a...

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Main Authors: Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services (contributor), Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
Format: TEXT
Language:English
English
Published: London : G.G. Harrap and Co. 1943
Subjects:
UK
Summary:1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams 8s. allowance for him till his sixteenth birthday, but no longer. Mary and Edith left school at 15 and got small jobs, but they had to attend a Day Continuation School or Workers' College on three afternoons a week. No allowances were payable for them after 15. At this time - we are in the 1960's - the higher school-leaving age and the compulsory part-time Colleges or Schools up to 18 were no longer novelties. Another new feature which had become conspicuous in our educational system was the Camp School for the use of school children whose homes and daily lives were "in city pent." These were schools built by the Government in attractive rural settings. They were filled by relays from urban schools all the year round. Every year between the ages of 12 and 16 Tom Black went out with his school class for a whole term to one of these Camp Schools. His parents always called it "Tom's holiday," and they declared that this three months' spell in the country, whether it came in winter or in high summer, did him more good, both mentally and physically, than all the rest of his schooling put together. These Camp Schools (thirty-two of which already exist ; they were built in 1939) had by then become the "Public Boarding Schools of the People." The years passed and the Black family grew up ; the children left home and married. Adam was a steady man, but he was not strong and lost a good deal of time through sickness. Eve, a healthy woman and younger than Adam, decided to go out to work again. There was a shortage of female labour in Bristol at this time, and she easily got a good job. She could have been exempted from her share of the weekly insurance contribution (3s. 6d.) as the wife of a wage-earner and the holder of a Housewife's Policy, but she preferred to pay. She wanted 46 15X/2/566/303