Social Security : The Story of British Social Progress and the Beveridge Plan

1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams it is essentially a small redistribution of consuming power and that redistribution of income will be mainly "horizontal" between millions of households of modest means. It is the men and women in these households w...

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Main Authors: Great Britain. Inter-departmental Committee on Social Insurance and Allied Services (contributor), Davison, Ronald C. (Ronald Conway), 1884-
Format: TEXT
Language:English
English
Published: London : G.G. Harrap and Co. 1943
Subjects:
UK
Summary:1943 1943 1940s 3 preliminary leaves, 9-62 pages : illustrations, diagrams it is essentially a small redistribution of consuming power and that redistribution of income will be mainly "horizontal" between millions of households of modest means. It is the men and women in these households who will pay 85 per cent. of the insurance contributions and the great bulk of direct and indirect taxation. We have already entered upon a more equalitarian age than our fathers knew. It will be a case of corporate self-help and the citizens as a whole will pay the bill for their own social security. They will pay partly through their contributions and partly through their taxes and rates. The question has been raised whether the wage-earner at the lower wage levels (say £3 per week) can afford to pay the proposed weekly insurance contribution of 4s. 3d. The fact is that the typical citizen has for years been accustomed to paying more than this weekly sum in compulsory and voluntary insurance premiums together. In future he need not continue his usual voluntary policy of funeral or death insurance, because that will be covered by the State scheme. On the other hand, there is no need to make a fetish of symmetry and uniformity of contributions and benefits, if and when there is a good case for differentiation. Agriculture may constitute such a case in the future as it has done in the past ; the farm worker has always had a cheaper unemployment insurance scheme. But in the war our agricultural economy has risen to much higher levels. If these gains in wages, etc., can be held or expanded after the war, no reason will remain for distinguishing between industry and agriculture in the field of social insurance. 58 15X/2/566/303